Abstract

This paper contributes to inclusive design. It seeks to extend the current definition of Inclusive Design, addressing motion, sensory and cognitive capability, by introducing emotional capability for self-inclusion as an additional component. To illustrate this perspective, the paper presents two constructive design research cases of designing for self-inclusion. One of these cases presents a finished design to support autistic children in self-inclusion. The other case presents a design exploration method to support participants in determining the emotional priorities which should underlie design interventions. The participants in this case sought to compensate a physical disability, one, a permanent one, and the other, a temporary one. The second case is presented in order to show the potential of starting from the experience of situations rather than specific design goals. The paper concludes that valuable design potential can arise from emotional and experiential insights from combined embodiment and participatory design activities.

Keywords:

inclusive design, emotion, constructive design research, self-inclusion

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License

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Jun 25th, 12:00 AM

Design for Self-inclusion: supporting emotional capability

This paper contributes to inclusive design. It seeks to extend the current definition of Inclusive Design, addressing motion, sensory and cognitive capability, by introducing emotional capability for self-inclusion as an additional component. To illustrate this perspective, the paper presents two constructive design research cases of designing for self-inclusion. One of these cases presents a finished design to support autistic children in self-inclusion. The other case presents a design exploration method to support participants in determining the emotional priorities which should underlie design interventions. The participants in this case sought to compensate a physical disability, one, a permanent one, and the other, a temporary one. The second case is presented in order to show the potential of starting from the experience of situations rather than specific design goals. The paper concludes that valuable design potential can arise from emotional and experiential insights from combined embodiment and participatory design activities.

 

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