Abstract

This study explored the experience of extensive green roofs [EGR] in order to understand more accurately the factors that contribute to their aesthetic experience. The research pursued a comprehensive approach to advise designers in the conception of EGRs and encourage their large-scale implementation to accelerate transition into a more sustainable and resilient way of living. The results of this study were provided by the combined analysis of an in-situ experience of 30 EGRs from Montreal and Quebec, as well as from 30 semi-structured interviews conducted with participants from Montreal (Canada). The study revealed a positive perception of EGRs and a greater appreciation than the one given to traditional roofs. Even if the environmental benefits of a green roof were recognized, participants found them useless when a physical or visual access to the roof was not granted. Thus, the paper proposes an intervention on roofs that could go beyond its strict greening. In fact, the design of EGRs should encourage human experience by physical presence when possible or at least draw attention to its observation.

Keywords:

sustainable futures, aesthetic experience, empathic design, extensive green roof [EGR]

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License

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Jun 25th, 12:00 AM

A Place to Be or, at Least, a Space to See: a qualitative inquiry on the experience and appreciation of extensive green roofs

This study explored the experience of extensive green roofs [EGR] in order to understand more accurately the factors that contribute to their aesthetic experience. The research pursued a comprehensive approach to advise designers in the conception of EGRs and encourage their large-scale implementation to accelerate transition into a more sustainable and resilient way of living. The results of this study were provided by the combined analysis of an in-situ experience of 30 EGRs from Montreal and Quebec, as well as from 30 semi-structured interviews conducted with participants from Montreal (Canada). The study revealed a positive perception of EGRs and a greater appreciation than the one given to traditional roofs. Even if the environmental benefits of a green roof were recognized, participants found them useless when a physical or visual access to the roof was not granted. Thus, the paper proposes an intervention on roofs that could go beyond its strict greening. In fact, the design of EGRs should encourage human experience by physical presence when possible or at least draw attention to its observation.

 

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