Abstract

Maker movement arose with democratisation of technology and outspreading of the culture of sharing knowledge. Makers are involved in every steps of creation and distribution of the items they make; ideation, production and selling. For production, both traditional and digital techniques are used by makers. Woodworking, which appears as one of the most common practices performed by makers, has a material-oriented skill knowledge which is mostly based on personal experience. Makers from different educational and professional backgrounds are able to acquire the tacit knowledge for woodworking via easily accessible printed and online resources. Besides, their relationship with craftsmen and customers act as other means of knowledge transfer. The aim of this study is to examine the tacit knowledge acquired and used by makers, the effects of makers’ educational backgrounds and motivations on knowledge transfer and product ranges produced. In order to do so, 24 makers dealing with woodworking were interviewed.

Keywords:

Maker Movement, Woodworking, Tacit Knowledge, Knowledge Transfer

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Jul 9th, 12:00 AM

Education, Motivation, Maker Practice: The Case of Woodworking

Maker movement arose with democratisation of technology and outspreading of the culture of sharing knowledge. Makers are involved in every steps of creation and distribution of the items they make; ideation, production and selling. For production, both traditional and digital techniques are used by makers. Woodworking, which appears as one of the most common practices performed by makers, has a material-oriented skill knowledge which is mostly based on personal experience. Makers from different educational and professional backgrounds are able to acquire the tacit knowledge for woodworking via easily accessible printed and online resources. Besides, their relationship with craftsmen and customers act as other means of knowledge transfer. The aim of this study is to examine the tacit knowledge acquired and used by makers, the effects of makers’ educational backgrounds and motivations on knowledge transfer and product ranges produced. In order to do so, 24 makers dealing with woodworking were interviewed.

 

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