Title

Designing Computer Supported Collaborative Conversations

Abstract

Several proponents of socially conscious design, or “design for good,” publish case studies and resources that embolden young designers to initiate projects in topics they care about. Additionally, online repositories and educational programming offer information and principles for practicing socially responsible design strategies. However, the typical design-for-good 'showcase' model lacks effective tools that invite and engage optimistic, young designers seeking involvement in socially responsible projects. According to Hugh Dubberly and Paul Pangaro, conversation directly affects a person’s ability to take action. A traditional design studio provides ample opportunities for collaborative conversations between engaged participants. Alternatively, online platforms are logical spaces for designers to engage in conversations with like-minded individuals to foster relationships and encourage participation. The following research investigates the potential for conversation to build online communities that share values and goals in lieu of a proximate studio space. The investigation proposes the design of an active social space wherein interested designers learn and converse, with the goal of becoming motivated to act. A variety of design visualizations, guided by specific frameworks (including Elizabeth Tunstall’s “Five Dimensions of Online Communities” and Étienne Wenger, Nancy White and John D. Smith’s nine community orientations) explores possibilities for online platforms to support conversation and collaboration, and engage contributors in ongoing exchanges that lead to actionable plans.

Keywords:

conversation, community, collaboration, socially responsible design strategies, visual workspace interface

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Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License
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Jul 9th, 12:00 AM

Designing Computer Supported Collaborative Conversations

Several proponents of socially conscious design, or “design for good,” publish case studies and resources that embolden young designers to initiate projects in topics they care about. Additionally, online repositories and educational programming offer information and principles for practicing socially responsible design strategies. However, the typical design-for-good 'showcase' model lacks effective tools that invite and engage optimistic, young designers seeking involvement in socially responsible projects. According to Hugh Dubberly and Paul Pangaro, conversation directly affects a person’s ability to take action. A traditional design studio provides ample opportunities for collaborative conversations between engaged participants. Alternatively, online platforms are logical spaces for designers to engage in conversations with like-minded individuals to foster relationships and encourage participation. The following research investigates the potential for conversation to build online communities that share values and goals in lieu of a proximate studio space. The investigation proposes the design of an active social space wherein interested designers learn and converse, with the goal of becoming motivated to act. A variety of design visualizations, guided by specific frameworks (including Elizabeth Tunstall’s “Five Dimensions of Online Communities” and Étienne Wenger, Nancy White and John D. Smith’s nine community orientations) explores possibilities for online platforms to support conversation and collaboration, and engage contributors in ongoing exchanges that lead to actionable plans.