Title

Repurposing Online Videos for Exploratory Design Research

Abstract

This paper presents the development of a generative toolkit which utilizes user-generated online videos (UGVs) as found data and repurposes them for exploratory design research and idea generation. The toolkit aims at supporting design students to browse, select and analyse UGVs for generating design insights and ideas for unfamiliar problem domains and hard-to-access user groups. The toolkit development process started with a retrospective analysis of a selection of industrial design studio projects followed by interviews with the students and tutors involved. An initial model was developed and used in a 5-week design studio project taken by 75 senior year industrial design students. Based upon the findings of these studies, the toolkit was revised and implemented in a half-day crash workshop involving a small number of participants. During the workshop, the participants were provided with a concise literature review regarding the design project topic, a YouTube playlist of related videos, video analysis board samples from previous studies, and video analysis board templates for different analysis modes. Since the toolkit puts a special emphasis on unfamiliar domains and challenging user groups, the workshop involved an expert in the video interpretation process. Through the UGVs the participants were able to immerse themselves into the subject and get familiar with the problem domain rapidly. The components of the toolkit such as video analysis samples and templates were also used as guidelines to interpret UGVs. The expert was directly involved in the video reviewing process, and made clarifications and remarks concerning the participants’ questions and comments for gaining insights. The paper reports the outcome and findings of this half-day workshop and discusses the key insights for further developing the toolkit.

Keywords:

exploratory design research, idea generation, user-generated videos, unfamiliar problem domains, design education

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Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License
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Jul 9th, 12:00 AM

Repurposing Online Videos for Exploratory Design Research

This paper presents the development of a generative toolkit which utilizes user-generated online videos (UGVs) as found data and repurposes them for exploratory design research and idea generation. The toolkit aims at supporting design students to browse, select and analyse UGVs for generating design insights and ideas for unfamiliar problem domains and hard-to-access user groups. The toolkit development process started with a retrospective analysis of a selection of industrial design studio projects followed by interviews with the students and tutors involved. An initial model was developed and used in a 5-week design studio project taken by 75 senior year industrial design students. Based upon the findings of these studies, the toolkit was revised and implemented in a half-day crash workshop involving a small number of participants. During the workshop, the participants were provided with a concise literature review regarding the design project topic, a YouTube playlist of related videos, video analysis board samples from previous studies, and video analysis board templates for different analysis modes. Since the toolkit puts a special emphasis on unfamiliar domains and challenging user groups, the workshop involved an expert in the video interpretation process. Through the UGVs the participants were able to immerse themselves into the subject and get familiar with the problem domain rapidly. The components of the toolkit such as video analysis samples and templates were also used as guidelines to interpret UGVs. The expert was directly involved in the video reviewing process, and made clarifications and remarks concerning the participants’ questions and comments for gaining insights. The paper reports the outcome and findings of this half-day workshop and discusses the key insights for further developing the toolkit.