Abstract

A world of many centers is a world where multiple worlds can flourish—where communities outside of the Center can design their own life projects, which reflect who they are, what they value, and who their ancestors had been. This paper argues that a Pluriversal Design—which aims to nurture alternative models of life and ways of world- making—is necessarily desire-based, in contrast with conventional needs-based approaches. I make a case for Social Design researchers and practitioners to hone our craft to respond primarily to the communities' desire, in contrast with the current focus on their needs, problems and deficits. I argue that needs-based approaches are conservative, implying the reproduction of a model of life —i.e., what is ‘desirable’ is supposedly know from the start and/or externally defined. Such approaches do not encourage the creation of new ‘possibles’. On the other hand, a desire-based approach is open-ended. In terms of creating a world of many worlds, what is the final result? We do not know yet; we will be doing something that has never been done before. Metaphorically, desire-based social change is about trailblazing with the help of a compass. Desire is the force that we have to engage when our task is to create new ways of shaping the human presence on this planet and new ways of world-making—an open- ended process towards the Pluriverse.

Keywords

Desire; needs-centered approaches; Pluriverse; Social Design

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License

Share

COinS
 
Jun 4th, 12:00 AM

Pluriversal design and desire-based design: desire as the impulse for human flourishing

A world of many centers is a world where multiple worlds can flourish—where communities outside of the Center can design their own life projects, which reflect who they are, what they value, and who their ancestors had been. This paper argues that a Pluriversal Design—which aims to nurture alternative models of life and ways of world- making—is necessarily desire-based, in contrast with conventional needs-based approaches. I make a case for Social Design researchers and practitioners to hone our craft to respond primarily to the communities' desire, in contrast with the current focus on their needs, problems and deficits. I argue that needs-based approaches are conservative, implying the reproduction of a model of life —i.e., what is ‘desirable’ is supposedly know from the start and/or externally defined. Such approaches do not encourage the creation of new ‘possibles’. On the other hand, a desire-based approach is open-ended. In terms of creating a world of many worlds, what is the final result? We do not know yet; we will be doing something that has never been done before. Metaphorically, desire-based social change is about trailblazing with the help of a compass. Desire is the force that we have to engage when our task is to create new ways of shaping the human presence on this planet and new ways of world-making—an open- ended process towards the Pluriverse.

 

To view the content in your browser, please download Adobe Reader or, alternately,
you may Download the file to your hard drive.

NOTE: The latest versions of Adobe Reader do not support viewing PDF files within Firefox on Mac OS and if you are using a modern (Intel) Mac, there is no official plugin for viewing PDF files within the browser window.