Abstract

The purpose of this study is to explore the inefficiencies of a one-size-fits-all curricular structure that has no bearing on the anthropological behavior of unique learners. Little is known about cultural relevance in learning through artistic means such as the visual arts, especially for unique project-based learners. This paper is a methodological consideration of a specific visual arts teaching approach for global application in the effort of shaping a “world of many centers.” Attention is given to the natural principles of ecological psychology, identifying the construct of the anthropological respectability of indigenous voices globally, and clarifying related scientific perception-action. The goal is to replace the archaic one-size-fits-all, colonial, “global north” practice with a creative culture- friendly learning paradigm that connects comfortably across disciplines and is adaptive to the teaching of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. As per Silverman (2012), empirical evidence identified the differences between the visual and spatial learner--auditory and sequential learner as critical learning curves that are commonplace among adolescents in general and is linked to cultural conditioning variables. The findings of the study address the unique responsiveness of learners by their aptitude. They point to the universal theoretical respect of a cross-cultural paradigm that is the basis for a unique socio-political model for non-European learners. This phenomenological study aims to establish a collective societal opportunistic premise that will help to carve out a respectful multiverse principle for the future without bias. The study seeks to define the global reality in which diversity, ethnicity, racial orientation, religious and sexual convictions, and social interest allow learners to be themselves within the scope of their uniqueness without sociopolitical hindrance.

Keywords

Art education, multiverse, pluralistic, anthropological, cultural-identification

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License

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Jun 4th, 12:00 AM

Defining the Value of Educational Equilibrium for Immigrant and At-Risk Youths Through Art Education in the 2020s and Beyond

The purpose of this study is to explore the inefficiencies of a one-size-fits-all curricular structure that has no bearing on the anthropological behavior of unique learners. Little is known about cultural relevance in learning through artistic means such as the visual arts, especially for unique project-based learners. This paper is a methodological consideration of a specific visual arts teaching approach for global application in the effort of shaping a “world of many centers.” Attention is given to the natural principles of ecological psychology, identifying the construct of the anthropological respectability of indigenous voices globally, and clarifying related scientific perception-action. The goal is to replace the archaic one-size-fits-all, colonial, “global north” practice with a creative culture- friendly learning paradigm that connects comfortably across disciplines and is adaptive to the teaching of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. As per Silverman (2012), empirical evidence identified the differences between the visual and spatial learner--auditory and sequential learner as critical learning curves that are commonplace among adolescents in general and is linked to cultural conditioning variables. The findings of the study address the unique responsiveness of learners by their aptitude. They point to the universal theoretical respect of a cross-cultural paradigm that is the basis for a unique socio-political model for non-European learners. This phenomenological study aims to establish a collective societal opportunistic premise that will help to carve out a respectful multiverse principle for the future without bias. The study seeks to define the global reality in which diversity, ethnicity, racial orientation, religious and sexual convictions, and social interest allow learners to be themselves within the scope of their uniqueness without sociopolitical hindrance.

 

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