Abstract

Design is a relatively new discipline in Uruguay. The dominant discourse, linked to Industrial Design-ID, has its beginnings in the foundation of the Centre of Industrial Design-CDI in 1987. This research is an invitation to look further into how ID has played a role in Uruguay -as a global-south country- related to economic and social structures introduced with the implementation of neoliberal production policies. In line with current global-south design discourses, the research aims to understand the role of institutions in the formation of design discourse(s) in Uruguay by approaching the CDI’s foundation from a decolonial worldview. Following the idea of de-schooling as a search for alternative systems in combination with an approach to design ontology as a means of autenticidad, I ask: What was the role of educational institutions in the construction of the current dominant design discourse in Uruguay? The conclusion I reached regards the importance of re-reading history through critically understanding the mixture of socio-political structures surrounding such one dominant design discourse. Whilst uncovering the historical dependency of Uruguay on Europe as its ‘only cultural origins’, it shows the importance of transiting a self-inclusive cultural process, by accepting the pluriversality that has historically converged in the Uruguay cultural formation.

Keywords

Decolonial design, Uruguayan design, Critical-discourse-analysis, un-learning

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License

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Jun 4th, 12:00 AM

(De)institution Design: decolonizing design discourse in Uruguay

Design is a relatively new discipline in Uruguay. The dominant discourse, linked to Industrial Design-ID, has its beginnings in the foundation of the Centre of Industrial Design-CDI in 1987. This research is an invitation to look further into how ID has played a role in Uruguay -as a global-south country- related to economic and social structures introduced with the implementation of neoliberal production policies. In line with current global-south design discourses, the research aims to understand the role of institutions in the formation of design discourse(s) in Uruguay by approaching the CDI’s foundation from a decolonial worldview. Following the idea of de-schooling as a search for alternative systems in combination with an approach to design ontology as a means of autenticidad, I ask: What was the role of educational institutions in the construction of the current dominant design discourse in Uruguay? The conclusion I reached regards the importance of re-reading history through critically understanding the mixture of socio-political structures surrounding such one dominant design discourse. Whilst uncovering the historical dependency of Uruguay on Europe as its ‘only cultural origins’, it shows the importance of transiting a self-inclusive cultural process, by accepting the pluriversality that has historically converged in the Uruguay cultural formation.

 

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