Abstract

The design research described in this paper used generative tools in co-creation sessions with users in a Danish bank. The aim was to investigate users relationship to money and to banks. In a follow-up interview participants stated that they had changed their perception and behaviour in relation to money – and in accordance with their values. Thus, contrary to expectations, the research did not lead to co-creation of values, but rather to a hypothesis that generative tools can act not only as a “language for co-creation aimed at the collective creativity” (Sanders & Stappers, 2008) but even as a “language for selfdialogue and value clarification aimed at the creativity of the individual” (Sørensen, 2011). In the ensuing research (2011) I proved this hypothesis, i.e. that designing can be used as a language for self-dialogue and value clarification by developing a radical new bankingservice, “The MoneyWorkshop”. Here customers are offered generative tools and special assignments in order to clarify their values and possibly change their relationship to their personal finances. The majority of the participants in the workshop subsequently changed their perception and behaviour. The paper explains “The MoneyWorkshop” referring to concepts within design as ‘graphics as cognitive tools’ and notions as ‘framing’, ‘reframing’, ‘design as doing’ represented in theories by Sanders, 2000, 2006, 2008, Schön 1983, 1993, Bamberger, 1983, Waks 2001, Paton & Dorst, 2010. I also refer to cognition-theory (Lakoff & Johnson, 1980, Ware, 2008, Kazmierczak, 2002) and in particular to Manz & Neck´s theory about “Thought Self-Leadership” (1992, 1999). My theoretical proof of the workings of MoneyWorkshop was that participants developed new cognitive strategies in accordance with Manz & Neck’s theory, which relates to a relatively new finding within cognitive science – that human beings can change dysfunctional beliefs and assumptions and thus change thinking patterns and behaviour (Seligman, 1991).

Keywords

generative tools, self-dialogue, value clarification, cognitive strategies

COinS
 
Jul 1st, 12:00 AM

Designing as a Language for Self-Dialogue and Value Clarification

The design research described in this paper used generative tools in co-creation sessions with users in a Danish bank. The aim was to investigate users relationship to money and to banks. In a follow-up interview participants stated that they had changed their perception and behaviour in relation to money – and in accordance with their values. Thus, contrary to expectations, the research did not lead to co-creation of values, but rather to a hypothesis that generative tools can act not only as a “language for co-creation aimed at the collective creativity” (Sanders & Stappers, 2008) but even as a “language for selfdialogue and value clarification aimed at the creativity of the individual” (Sørensen, 2011). In the ensuing research (2011) I proved this hypothesis, i.e. that designing can be used as a language for self-dialogue and value clarification by developing a radical new bankingservice, “The MoneyWorkshop”. Here customers are offered generative tools and special assignments in order to clarify their values and possibly change their relationship to their personal finances. The majority of the participants in the workshop subsequently changed their perception and behaviour. The paper explains “The MoneyWorkshop” referring to concepts within design as ‘graphics as cognitive tools’ and notions as ‘framing’, ‘reframing’, ‘design as doing’ represented in theories by Sanders, 2000, 2006, 2008, Schön 1983, 1993, Bamberger, 1983, Waks 2001, Paton & Dorst, 2010. I also refer to cognition-theory (Lakoff & Johnson, 1980, Ware, 2008, Kazmierczak, 2002) and in particular to Manz & Neck´s theory about “Thought Self-Leadership” (1992, 1999). My theoretical proof of the workings of MoneyWorkshop was that participants developed new cognitive strategies in accordance with Manz & Neck’s theory, which relates to a relatively new finding within cognitive science – that human beings can change dysfunctional beliefs and assumptions and thus change thinking patterns and behaviour (Seligman, 1991).

 

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