Abstract

Airports are vital sources of income to a country and city. Airports are often understood from a management perspective, rather than a passenger perspective. As passengers are a vital customer of airports, a passenger perspective can provide a novel approach in understanding and improving the airport experience. This paper focuses on the study of passenger experiences at airports. This research is built on recent investigations of passenger discretionary activities in airports by the authors, which have provided a new perspective on understanding the airport experience. The research reported in this paper involves field studies at three Australian airports. Seventy one people who had impending travel were recruited to take part in the field study. Data collection methods included video-recorded observation and post-travel interviews. Observations were coded and a list of activities performed was developed. These activities were then classified into an activity taxonomy, depending on the activity location and context. The study demonstrates that there is a wide range of activities performed by passengers as they navigate through the airport. The emerging activity taxonomy consists of eight categories. They include: (i) processing (ii) preparatory (iii ) consumptive (iv) social (v) entertainment (vi) passive (vii) queuing and (viii) moving. The research provides a novel perspective to understand the experience of passenger at international airports. It has been applied in airports to improve passenger processing and reduce waiting times. The significance of the taxonomy lies in its potential application to airport terminal design and how it can be utilised to understand and improve the passenger experience.

Keywords

activity-centred design, airport experience, passenger experience, taxonomy

COinS
 
Jul 1st, 12:00 AM

Towards a Taxonomy of Airport Passenger Activities

Airports are vital sources of income to a country and city. Airports are often understood from a management perspective, rather than a passenger perspective. As passengers are a vital customer of airports, a passenger perspective can provide a novel approach in understanding and improving the airport experience. This paper focuses on the study of passenger experiences at airports. This research is built on recent investigations of passenger discretionary activities in airports by the authors, which have provided a new perspective on understanding the airport experience. The research reported in this paper involves field studies at three Australian airports. Seventy one people who had impending travel were recruited to take part in the field study. Data collection methods included video-recorded observation and post-travel interviews. Observations were coded and a list of activities performed was developed. These activities were then classified into an activity taxonomy, depending on the activity location and context. The study demonstrates that there is a wide range of activities performed by passengers as they navigate through the airport. The emerging activity taxonomy consists of eight categories. They include: (i) processing (ii) preparatory (iii ) consumptive (iv) social (v) entertainment (vi) passive (vii) queuing and (viii) moving. The research provides a novel perspective to understand the experience of passenger at international airports. It has been applied in airports to improve passenger processing and reduce waiting times. The significance of the taxonomy lies in its potential application to airport terminal design and how it can be utilised to understand and improve the passenger experience.

 

To view the content in your browser, please download Adobe Reader or, alternately,
you may Download the file to your hard drive.

NOTE: The latest versions of Adobe Reader do not support viewing PDF files within Firefox on Mac OS and if you are using a modern (Intel) Mac, there is no official plugin for viewing PDF files within the browser window.