Abstract

This paper attempts to articulate a philosophical underpinning, an attitude, with which to approach the design of interactive medical devices. This exploration is undertaken through drawing upon and connecting ideas from relevant discourses within the; medical, human computer interaction (HCI), and design fields. Through exploring the common discourse of phenomenological research in these three fields, this paper seeks to provide an introduction to a transdisciplinary foundation relevant to researchers working within the intersection of these fields. In my own design practice, this is explored through the co-creation of an intersubjective feedback cycle between designer and design recipient through a combination of co-design sessions and speculative design probes. Stopping short of suggesting a framework, this paper proposes that adopting a phenomenological attitude to research might benefit design researchers working in the medical field, providing a transdisciplinarycommon ground for working within, and communicating across; design, HCI, and medicine.

Keywords:

phenomenology; medical device design; co-design; interaction

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License

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Jun 17th, 12:00 AM

Co-creating narrative: an approach to the design of interactive medical devices, informed by phenomenology

This paper attempts to articulate a philosophical underpinning, an attitude, with which to approach the design of interactive medical devices. This exploration is undertaken through drawing upon and connecting ideas from relevant discourses within the; medical, human computer interaction (HCI), and design fields. Through exploring the common discourse of phenomenological research in these three fields, this paper seeks to provide an introduction to a transdisciplinary foundation relevant to researchers working within the intersection of these fields. In my own design practice, this is explored through the co-creation of an intersubjective feedback cycle between designer and design recipient through a combination of co-design sessions and speculative design probes. Stopping short of suggesting a framework, this paper proposes that adopting a phenomenological attitude to research might benefit design researchers working in the medical field, providing a transdisciplinarycommon ground for working within, and communicating across; design, HCI, and medicine.

 

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