Abstract

Temporary physical spaces are increasingly used as catalyst to engage consumers and users in co-design activities. Whilst there are published insights into the design and facilitation of these spaces, a systematic view on their research opportunities and design requirements is still missing. This paper takes a first exploration into the employment of physical pop-up shops for user and stakeholder engagement. It analyses theory from marketing and human geography from a design research perspective to formulate design requirements for pop-up shops with the goal of engagement and co-design. It also proposes to categorize pop-up shop research as experience prototyping for the near future, thus firmly placing it into the framework of the design research landscape. To illustrate this proposition, it uses data from three cases of an iterative pop-up shop research project. Finally, it discusses conclusions about the requirements and opportunities for co-design in pop-up shop research.

Keywords:

co-design, user engagement, pop-up shop, experience prototyping

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License

Share

COinS
 
Jun 25th, 12:00 AM

Exploring the Pop-up Shop for Co-design Research

Temporary physical spaces are increasingly used as catalyst to engage consumers and users in co-design activities. Whilst there are published insights into the design and facilitation of these spaces, a systematic view on their research opportunities and design requirements is still missing. This paper takes a first exploration into the employment of physical pop-up shops for user and stakeholder engagement. It analyses theory from marketing and human geography from a design research perspective to formulate design requirements for pop-up shops with the goal of engagement and co-design. It also proposes to categorize pop-up shop research as experience prototyping for the near future, thus firmly placing it into the framework of the design research landscape. To illustrate this proposition, it uses data from three cases of an iterative pop-up shop research project. Finally, it discusses conclusions about the requirements and opportunities for co-design in pop-up shop research.

 

To view the content in your browser, please download Adobe Reader or, alternately,
you may Download the file to your hard drive.

NOTE: The latest versions of Adobe Reader do not support viewing PDF files within Firefox on Mac OS and if you are using a modern (Intel) Mac, there is no official plugin for viewing PDF files within the browser window.