Abstract

While able to automatically generate and optimise designs for variables provided by a designer, today’s computational design tools do not specialise in the earlier, more tacit tasks such as gathering and sorting disparate information or generating hypotheses and identifying novel directions. This paper presents a review of computational technologies that could potentially play a role in these early stage design activities. Using a framework that deconstructs design activities into underlying tasks, an ontology that reviews the various computational tools that could be applied in these activities was created. Computational technologies such as neural networks and stochastic algorithms were found to provide features that could potentially allow for discovering and linking new information together in order to provoke the – often unexpected – inspiration that can guide designs in the latter phases of development.

Keywords:

computational design tools; creativity support; early design process

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License

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Jun 25th, 12:00 AM

An Ontology of Computational Tools for Design Activities

While able to automatically generate and optimise designs for variables provided by a designer, today’s computational design tools do not specialise in the earlier, more tacit tasks such as gathering and sorting disparate information or generating hypotheses and identifying novel directions. This paper presents a review of computational technologies that could potentially play a role in these early stage design activities. Using a framework that deconstructs design activities into underlying tasks, an ontology that reviews the various computational tools that could be applied in these activities was created. Computational technologies such as neural networks and stochastic algorithms were found to provide features that could potentially allow for discovering and linking new information together in order to provoke the – often unexpected – inspiration that can guide designs in the latter phases of development.

 

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