Title

Touch: Exploring RFID

Abstract

Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) is a technology that has seen much hype and controversy. Small, wireless, battery-less RFID tags have become embedded in many everyday objects; from travelcards in every major metropolis, to mobile phones, library books, passports, tickets and a wide range of consumer goods, there are now over a billion tags in use worldwide. Some say that the technology offers a new era of smart objects and frictionless commerce, but others are protesting the drive towards the digitisation of everyday life. The Touch project was started in 2006 to explore RFID technology through a broad set of design processes. The intention was to create a diverse range of applications, tangible prototypes, future visions and communicative media, in order to offer the design community and a wider public a better understanding of the opportunities and consequences inherent in this new technology.

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Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License

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Touch: Exploring RFID

Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) is a technology that has seen much hype and controversy. Small, wireless, battery-less RFID tags have become embedded in many everyday objects; from travelcards in every major metropolis, to mobile phones, library books, passports, tickets and a wide range of consumer goods, there are now over a billion tags in use worldwide. Some say that the technology offers a new era of smart objects and frictionless commerce, but others are protesting the drive towards the digitisation of everyday life. The Touch project was started in 2006 to explore RFID technology through a broad set of design processes. The intention was to create a diverse range of applications, tangible prototypes, future visions and communicative media, in order to offer the design community and a wider public a better understanding of the opportunities and consequences inherent in this new technology.