Abstract

As the capacity of the digital medium expands so the potential for creative design increases. Yet, while the rigid and artificial effects of traditional presentation techniques, such as photo-montages and early solid models, provided a degree of ambiguity regarding the final outcome of the project, the almost seductive power of the hyper-real is beginning to narrow the gap on the licence of interpretation. Consequentially the credibility and ethics of the image may start to come into question if the integrity of the architecture as built fails to meet the expectations, which the image inspired in the first place. By addressing the potential impact of digital imagery on professional practice, the following paper presents the results of a pilot survey of building professionals, which addresses the quality, content and authenticity of both conventional photography and digitally produced images used within the construction industry. Questioning the potential impact of digital imagery on professional practice and in particular its application by the architectural illustrator in promoting prospective projects, the paper will outline a series of recommendations which attempt to alleviate the apprehension activated by the results of the survey.

Keywords:

Digital representation, Conventional imaging, Knowledge transfer/credibility, Client expectation

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Nov 17th, 12:00 AM

Digital Illustration and Litigation: Anticipating the Implication of Digital Imaging Within the Architectural Profession.

As the capacity of the digital medium expands so the potential for creative design increases. Yet, while the rigid and artificial effects of traditional presentation techniques, such as photo-montages and early solid models, provided a degree of ambiguity regarding the final outcome of the project, the almost seductive power of the hyper-real is beginning to narrow the gap on the licence of interpretation. Consequentially the credibility and ethics of the image may start to come into question if the integrity of the architecture as built fails to meet the expectations, which the image inspired in the first place. By addressing the potential impact of digital imagery on professional practice, the following paper presents the results of a pilot survey of building professionals, which addresses the quality, content and authenticity of both conventional photography and digitally produced images used within the construction industry. Questioning the potential impact of digital imagery on professional practice and in particular its application by the architectural illustrator in promoting prospective projects, the paper will outline a series of recommendations which attempt to alleviate the apprehension activated by the results of the survey.

 

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