Abstract

An extensive literature review undertaken at the outset of this endeavor revealed that the current status of interactive visual systems development, implementation and sustenance has evolved from theory and research that is neither especially pluralistic nor synergistic. There exist two distinct systems design approaches: 1. the largely positivistic and functionally guided approaches derived from the realm of information technology (IT), and 2. the incorporation of the more qualitatively based, aesthetically and experientially guided approaches derived from the realm of dynamic interaction design. The authors hypothesized that this paradigmatic schism required a new approach that could bridge fundamental gaps in knowledge and understanding between visual interaction designers and IT professionals. They further hypothesized that achieving this goal would enhance the usability and usefulness of many types of interactive visual systems. The authors created a theoretical, pluralistic process model comprised of aesthetic and positivist design characteristics of interactive visual systems.The model consisted of a process framework and a typology of design characteristics that depicted how aesthetic and positivist design characteristics affect each other. They then tested the hypothesis that diverse individuals perceive design characteristics in interface construction across paradigms by conducting a small-scale visual experiment on 105 participants. This hypothesis was formed by combining an aesthetic visual design approach with a functional, systemsbased approach. This experiment strongly confirmed the hypothesis; it affirmed the efficacy of using this type of pluralistic research typology and framework to better inform designers and IT researchers and practitioners who are challenged to design dynamic, interactive visual systems.

Keywords:

Aesthetics, It Systems Development, Interactive Visual Systems Design, Pluralistic Research Framework, Positivism, User Experience

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Jul 7th, 12:00 AM

Synergizing Positivistic and Aesthetic Approaches to Improve the Development of Interactive, Visual Systems Design

An extensive literature review undertaken at the outset of this endeavor revealed that the current status of interactive visual systems development, implementation and sustenance has evolved from theory and research that is neither especially pluralistic nor synergistic. There exist two distinct systems design approaches: 1. the largely positivistic and functionally guided approaches derived from the realm of information technology (IT), and 2. the incorporation of the more qualitatively based, aesthetically and experientially guided approaches derived from the realm of dynamic interaction design. The authors hypothesized that this paradigmatic schism required a new approach that could bridge fundamental gaps in knowledge and understanding between visual interaction designers and IT professionals. They further hypothesized that achieving this goal would enhance the usability and usefulness of many types of interactive visual systems. The authors created a theoretical, pluralistic process model comprised of aesthetic and positivist design characteristics of interactive visual systems.The model consisted of a process framework and a typology of design characteristics that depicted how aesthetic and positivist design characteristics affect each other. They then tested the hypothesis that diverse individuals perceive design characteristics in interface construction across paradigms by conducting a small-scale visual experiment on 105 participants. This hypothesis was formed by combining an aesthetic visual design approach with a functional, systemsbased approach. This experiment strongly confirmed the hypothesis; it affirmed the efficacy of using this type of pluralistic research typology and framework to better inform designers and IT researchers and practitioners who are challenged to design dynamic, interactive visual systems.

 

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