Abstract

The paper will describe how digital information gathered in medical diagnostic practices has been utilized in an area traditionally reliant on manual medical sculpting techniques. Working in conjunction with iRSM (Institute for Reconstructive Sciences in Medicine), the authors have participated in the development of systems and processes that have resulted in: enhanced surgical planning, elimination of surgeries and improved accuracy of prosthetics. As iRSM is the only centre in Canada to provide these services, it has attracted many international medical facilities and practitioners to use these digital workflows in their own practice. Industrial Designers were originally consulted by iRSM on a project-by-project basis, consistently demonstrating the value of design research strategies. This demonstration of value resulted in the demand for a full-time designer within iRSM’s interdisciplinary team, opening new insights and opportunities within the clinical environment. The integration of design into this area of medicine resulted in the development of a new field of design interaction, education and research. The collection of numerous case studies over an eight-year period provided the background for the development of a graduate program of study dedicated to this new field. The result of this work has been presented exclusively within the medical arena both at conferences and workshops. This academic year, the first student to be enrolled in a Master of Science in Rehabilitation Medicine with a specialization in Surgical Design and Simulation came to fruition. The creation of this new field of study is a continuation of this relationship, as the first candidate has a degree in Industrial Design, but will gain the necessary skills to become a clinician and researcher within a clinical practice. This new “species” of designer is at the forefront of new opportunities for design education and research with a focus on patient-centered health care delivery.

Keywords:

Health Care, Industrial Design, Computer Aided Design, Reflective Practices, Visualization, Rapid Prototyping

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Jul 7th, 12:00 AM

Transformative Design: From Consultant to Clinician

The paper will describe how digital information gathered in medical diagnostic practices has been utilized in an area traditionally reliant on manual medical sculpting techniques. Working in conjunction with iRSM (Institute for Reconstructive Sciences in Medicine), the authors have participated in the development of systems and processes that have resulted in: enhanced surgical planning, elimination of surgeries and improved accuracy of prosthetics. As iRSM is the only centre in Canada to provide these services, it has attracted many international medical facilities and practitioners to use these digital workflows in their own practice. Industrial Designers were originally consulted by iRSM on a project-by-project basis, consistently demonstrating the value of design research strategies. This demonstration of value resulted in the demand for a full-time designer within iRSM’s interdisciplinary team, opening new insights and opportunities within the clinical environment. The integration of design into this area of medicine resulted in the development of a new field of design interaction, education and research. The collection of numerous case studies over an eight-year period provided the background for the development of a graduate program of study dedicated to this new field. The result of this work has been presented exclusively within the medical arena both at conferences and workshops. This academic year, the first student to be enrolled in a Master of Science in Rehabilitation Medicine with a specialization in Surgical Design and Simulation came to fruition. The creation of this new field of study is a continuation of this relationship, as the first candidate has a degree in Industrial Design, but will gain the necessary skills to become a clinician and researcher within a clinical practice. This new “species” of designer is at the forefront of new opportunities for design education and research with a focus on patient-centered health care delivery.

 

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