Abstract

Advances in technology are increasingly defining the character of knowledge (Harrod 2007), and highlighting the opportunities that exist for artists, designers, craftspeople and researchers to use new technologies for extending the breadth and scope of contemporary practice. An example of this is the digital printing of textiles. Not only are the printed images themselves open to novel forms of manipulation and interpretation, through the use of innovative fabrics, dyes and techniques, but the technologies involved in the digital printing process increasingly provide designers with a wide range of new options. On the one hand, it is possible to take an aesthetic approach to textile design while on the other technology-based or process-driven perspectives may also be exploited (Potter 2002). However, what happens in the studio environment when these disparate domains overlap? This paper investigates the relationship that is forged when traditional craft practices and advanced technology are brought together through studio inquiry. In order to challenge this phenomenon and the subsequent issue of subjectivity, my practice-based research uses grounded theory to reveal how the use of traditional materials and techniques can be integrated within digitally printed textile design to develop a general theory relating to contemporary design practice. A range of experiments were undertaken to encourage convergence with neighbouring disciplines, and a series of questionnaires, then semi-structured interviews conducted with skilled practitioners from adjoining fields to confront current perceptions of design practice, and challenge non-objective research positions in the creative industries (Frayling 2011).

Keywords

digital printing, textiles, craft, design, theory

COinS
 
Jul 1st, 12:00 AM

Digitally Printed Textiles: New processes & theories

Advances in technology are increasingly defining the character of knowledge (Harrod 2007), and highlighting the opportunities that exist for artists, designers, craftspeople and researchers to use new technologies for extending the breadth and scope of contemporary practice. An example of this is the digital printing of textiles. Not only are the printed images themselves open to novel forms of manipulation and interpretation, through the use of innovative fabrics, dyes and techniques, but the technologies involved in the digital printing process increasingly provide designers with a wide range of new options. On the one hand, it is possible to take an aesthetic approach to textile design while on the other technology-based or process-driven perspectives may also be exploited (Potter 2002). However, what happens in the studio environment when these disparate domains overlap? This paper investigates the relationship that is forged when traditional craft practices and advanced technology are brought together through studio inquiry. In order to challenge this phenomenon and the subsequent issue of subjectivity, my practice-based research uses grounded theory to reveal how the use of traditional materials and techniques can be integrated within digitally printed textile design to develop a general theory relating to contemporary design practice. A range of experiments were undertaken to encourage convergence with neighbouring disciplines, and a series of questionnaires, then semi-structured interviews conducted with skilled practitioners from adjoining fields to confront current perceptions of design practice, and challenge non-objective research positions in the creative industries (Frayling 2011).

 

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