Abstract

This research explores how dynamically moving one's body as a means of creating meaning and imaging the new can impact one's creative abilities and expression. The behavior and creative output of small groups of people engaged in creative sessions were investigated. They explored the question “What’s next?” using one of four methods: ~ Traditional focus group ~ Image collaging1 ~ Sandquery2 ~ Enactavision3 People’s use of the three participatory methods (image collaging, Sandquery and Enactavision) was compared to the control condition (traditional focus group). Each method followed a similar script and used the same activities and post-session questionnaire. Triangulation of data using several measurement techniques was performed because of the exploratory nature of the research. Analysis focused on where similarities and differences occurred when comparing dynamic body movement and collectively creative (Sanders, 2012) expression. This research shows that small groups of people who make meaningful movements, play pretend, or enact while thinking and generating creative possibilities produce more creative output than do people who brainstorm together with minimal body movement.

Keywords:

Creativity, Enactment, Participatory design, Generative tools, Methods

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Jun 16th, 12:00 AM

Enhancing Collective Creativity with Enactment: A Comparative Study of Design Research Methods

This research explores how dynamically moving one's body as a means of creating meaning and imaging the new can impact one's creative abilities and expression. The behavior and creative output of small groups of people engaged in creative sessions were investigated. They explored the question “What’s next?” using one of four methods: ~ Traditional focus group ~ Image collaging1 ~ Sandquery2 ~ Enactavision3 People’s use of the three participatory methods (image collaging, Sandquery and Enactavision) was compared to the control condition (traditional focus group). Each method followed a similar script and used the same activities and post-session questionnaire. Triangulation of data using several measurement techniques was performed because of the exploratory nature of the research. Analysis focused on where similarities and differences occurred when comparing dynamic body movement and collectively creative (Sanders, 2012) expression. This research shows that small groups of people who make meaningful movements, play pretend, or enact while thinking and generating creative possibilities produce more creative output than do people who brainstorm together with minimal body movement.

 

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