Abstract

The main aim of this paper is to consider the way in which reflective practice can assist practitioners in better understanding their individual knowledge and experience. Transitioning from a design novice to a design expert is described as a vague process, in which reflective practice can offer a level of understanding that provides an important insight into professional development within design. Through a comparison of two methods of reflection and analysis of reflective practice data, it is argued that repertory grid interviews have the potential to be a catalyst for double- loop learning within individuals; providing people with a platform to reflect on their beliefs and values in addition to their approach towards problem solving. This argument is based on the ability of repertory grids to uncover some of the implicit knowledge developed by designers, which is a distinct advantage to alternative methods of reflection and which is necessary to improve professional practice understanding and learning.

Keywords:

Design Methods, Sufficiency, Practice, Design Research

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License

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Jun 17th, 12:00 AM

Double-loop reflective practice as an approach to understanding knowledge and experience.

The main aim of this paper is to consider the way in which reflective practice can assist practitioners in better understanding their individual knowledge and experience. Transitioning from a design novice to a design expert is described as a vague process, in which reflective practice can offer a level of understanding that provides an important insight into professional development within design. Through a comparison of two methods of reflection and analysis of reflective practice data, it is argued that repertory grid interviews have the potential to be a catalyst for double- loop learning within individuals; providing people with a platform to reflect on their beliefs and values in addition to their approach towards problem solving. This argument is based on the ability of repertory grids to uncover some of the implicit knowledge developed by designers, which is a distinct advantage to alternative methods of reflection and which is necessary to improve professional practice understanding and learning.

 

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