Abstract

Would a work—a painting, a building, a chair or a display—always operate within the framework of human intention? To bring thinking into the future, there is a need for future-focused methodologies. In this paper I will re-work the past by addressing the agency beyond human intention. By using the 1972 MoMA exhibition “Italy: The New Domestic Landscape” as the empirical case, the paper will show how not only humans conceptualize reality, but things themselves have the capacity to display the future.

Keywords:

nonhuman agency; ontology; display; climate change

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License

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Jun 17th, 12:00 AM

(Re)working the Past, (Dis)playing the Future. Italy: The New Domestic Landscape at MoMA, 1972

Would a work—a painting, a building, a chair or a display—always operate within the framework of human intention? To bring thinking into the future, there is a need for future-focused methodologies. In this paper I will re-work the past by addressing the agency beyond human intention. By using the 1972 MoMA exhibition “Italy: The New Domestic Landscape” as the empirical case, the paper will show how not only humans conceptualize reality, but things themselves have the capacity to display the future.

 

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