Abstract

In craft practice, embodied knowledge is constructed (‘coded’) through the hands-on experience of making and application of technical rules, subsequently deconstructed (‘decoded’) through reflection and analysis, before being rebuilt (‘recoded’) to further develop practice and outcomes. In this paper practice-led PhD research into the development composite woven garments is used to demonstrate the vital role that process and object analysis play in the advancement of creative practice and a successful transition from hand to digital production. Drawing parallels between hand weaving and computer use, it explores how the ‘digital thinking’ inherent in weaving can facilitate a productive relationship with digital weaving technologies. Presented as a ‘visual essay’ this paper aims to bridge the gap between implicit and explicit knowledge, using a predominantly visual method to maximise the reach of the research, communicating implicit and explicit knowledge with equal clarity and offering an alternative approach to the dissemination of practice-led research.

Keywords:

embodied knowledge; composite garments; hand weaving; digital production

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License

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Jun 17th, 12:00 AM

Code, Decode, Recode: Constructing, deconstructing and reconstructing knowledge through making

In craft practice, embodied knowledge is constructed (‘coded’) through the hands-on experience of making and application of technical rules, subsequently deconstructed (‘decoded’) through reflection and analysis, before being rebuilt (‘recoded’) to further develop practice and outcomes. In this paper practice-led PhD research into the development composite woven garments is used to demonstrate the vital role that process and object analysis play in the advancement of creative practice and a successful transition from hand to digital production. Drawing parallels between hand weaving and computer use, it explores how the ‘digital thinking’ inherent in weaving can facilitate a productive relationship with digital weaving technologies. Presented as a ‘visual essay’ this paper aims to bridge the gap between implicit and explicit knowledge, using a predominantly visual method to maximise the reach of the research, communicating implicit and explicit knowledge with equal clarity and offering an alternative approach to the dissemination of practice-led research.

 

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