Abstract

Type 2 diabetes continues to grow significantly around the world as a result of nutrition transition and obesity. Prevention methods depends on how well individuals at risk adapt to a healthy nutritional lifestyle and increase their physical exercise. It is an emergent situation for diabetes risk communication and education programs specifically in vulnerable societies. This study leverages an interactive platform for diabetes risk communication using human-object interaction. The approach is based on an ‘object-based learning’ method for communicating risk. The designed object has elements to motivate and support the community toward an increase in physical activity and a healthy diet. Furthermore, this research looks at risk perceptions and stakeholder engagement of lay people from vulnerable communities. Understanding risk perception and misconception is important to provide diabetes educational services in accordance to local demands.

Keywords:

Risk Communication, Design for Behaviour Change, Human-Object Interaction, Mental Model

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License

Share

COinS
 
Jun 17th, 12:00 AM

A Design Approach for Risk Communication, the Case of Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 diabetes continues to grow significantly around the world as a result of nutrition transition and obesity. Prevention methods depends on how well individuals at risk adapt to a healthy nutritional lifestyle and increase their physical exercise. It is an emergent situation for diabetes risk communication and education programs specifically in vulnerable societies. This study leverages an interactive platform for diabetes risk communication using human-object interaction. The approach is based on an ‘object-based learning’ method for communicating risk. The designed object has elements to motivate and support the community toward an increase in physical activity and a healthy diet. Furthermore, this research looks at risk perceptions and stakeholder engagement of lay people from vulnerable communities. Understanding risk perception and misconception is important to provide diabetes educational services in accordance to local demands.

 

To view the content in your browser, please download Adobe Reader or, alternately,
you may Download the file to your hard drive.

NOTE: The latest versions of Adobe Reader do not support viewing PDF files within Firefox on Mac OS and if you are using a modern (Intel) Mac, there is no official plugin for viewing PDF files within the browser window.