Abstract

This paper engages with the former prison at Long Kesh in Belfast, Northern Ireland, and, in particular, with the republican inmates’ protests in the 1970s and early 80s. Addressing the penal institution itself, its architecture, interior designs and the rituals implemented there, the paper argues these were not only designed but involved on-going design processes to which inmates responded by the developing a complex design practice involving the site itself as well as their bodies and the way these are made to signify within the semiotic regime of the penal institution.

Keywords:

design, politics, bodies, semiotics

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License

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Jun 17th, 12:00 AM

Long Kesh: Site - Sign - Body

This paper engages with the former prison at Long Kesh in Belfast, Northern Ireland, and, in particular, with the republican inmates’ protests in the 1970s and early 80s. Addressing the penal institution itself, its architecture, interior designs and the rituals implemented there, the paper argues these were not only designed but involved on-going design processes to which inmates responded by the developing a complex design practice involving the site itself as well as their bodies and the way these are made to signify within the semiotic regime of the penal institution.

 

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