Abstract

Design practice involves several disciplines, and when the manufacturing process demands special skills, designers outsource the work to craftspersons. Traditionally, craftspersons make a living by taking orders and delivering handmade artefacts according to the designer’s prescriptions. In this paper, we ask the following: What are the essential issues emerging when designers outsource the manufacturing of their designs to professional craft practitioners? We present a case study in which aspects of sharing and experiential knowledge are analysed both from the point of view of the designers and the craftspersons involved in the making of artefacts for an exhibition. We found that having experiential knowledge of various materials benefits the designer and that material agency is an important issue in this process because the properties and production processes play a large role in the aesthetics of the final artefact. Multiple questions of authorship are raised in this context because of the aspect of outsourcing, and we suggest that this could be better reflected in the presentation of the final artefacts.

Keywords:

co-creation, design research, experiential knowledge, authorship

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License

Share

COinS
 
Jun 25th, 12:00 AM

Co-creation in Professional Craft Practice

Design practice involves several disciplines, and when the manufacturing process demands special skills, designers outsource the work to craftspersons. Traditionally, craftspersons make a living by taking orders and delivering handmade artefacts according to the designer’s prescriptions. In this paper, we ask the following: What are the essential issues emerging when designers outsource the manufacturing of their designs to professional craft practitioners? We present a case study in which aspects of sharing and experiential knowledge are analysed both from the point of view of the designers and the craftspersons involved in the making of artefacts for an exhibition. We found that having experiential knowledge of various materials benefits the designer and that material agency is an important issue in this process because the properties and production processes play a large role in the aesthetics of the final artefact. Multiple questions of authorship are raised in this context because of the aspect of outsourcing, and we suggest that this could be better reflected in the presentation of the final artefacts.

 

To view the content in your browser, please download Adobe Reader or, alternately,
you may Download the file to your hard drive.

NOTE: The latest versions of Adobe Reader do not support viewing PDF files within Firefox on Mac OS and if you are using a modern (Intel) Mac, there is no official plugin for viewing PDF files within the browser window.