Abstract

Combining practices of craft and interaction design opens up new opportunities for both domains but structuring such cross-domain collaboration poses challenges. How to set up a crafter-designer collaboration to utilize the different fields of expertise and include separate practices? We address this question through a co-design research approach. First, we present an overview over existing approaches. Then, we propose our perspective that builds on an initial distinction between the collaborators, repositions the construction of the brief, and culminates into a collaboration through the shared object. Finally, we describe a successful collaboration between an interaction designer and a ceramic artist to support our model. We present a collaboration model that builds on distinct expertise, evolves through a design-based brief, and realizes through a shared dialectic object. We present this through a case study in pottery but we argue that the model is not tied to a particular craft technique and transferable to other collaborative settings in this field.

Keywords:

craft; physical computing; design collaboration

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License

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Jun 25th, 12:00 AM

Combining Practices in Craft and Design

Combining practices of craft and interaction design opens up new opportunities for both domains but structuring such cross-domain collaboration poses challenges. How to set up a crafter-designer collaboration to utilize the different fields of expertise and include separate practices? We address this question through a co-design research approach. First, we present an overview over existing approaches. Then, we propose our perspective that builds on an initial distinction between the collaborators, repositions the construction of the brief, and culminates into a collaboration through the shared object. Finally, we describe a successful collaboration between an interaction designer and a ceramic artist to support our model. We present a collaboration model that builds on distinct expertise, evolves through a design-based brief, and realizes through a shared dialectic object. We present this through a case study in pottery but we argue that the model is not tied to a particular craft technique and transferable to other collaborative settings in this field.

 

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