Abstract

This study looks at the qualities of learner-generated online content, as rated by experts, and how these relate to learners’ engagement through comments and conversations around this content. The work uploaded to an Online Design Studio by students across a Design and Innovation Qualification was rated and analysed quantitatively using the Consensual Assessment Technique (CAT). Correlations of qualities to comments made on this content were considered and a qualitative analysis of the comments was carried out. It was observed that design students do not necessarily pay attention to the same qualities in learner-generated content that experts rate highly, except for a particular quality at the first level of study. The content that students do engage with also changes with increasing levels of study. These findings have implications for the learning design of online design courses and qualifications as well as for design institutions seeking to supplement proximate design studios with Online Social Network Services.

Keywords:

online design studio; online social network; learner-generated content; consensual assessment technique

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License

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Jun 25th, 12:00 AM

Engaging Qualities: factors affecting learner attention in online design studios

This study looks at the qualities of learner-generated online content, as rated by experts, and how these relate to learners’ engagement through comments and conversations around this content. The work uploaded to an Online Design Studio by students across a Design and Innovation Qualification was rated and analysed quantitatively using the Consensual Assessment Technique (CAT). Correlations of qualities to comments made on this content were considered and a qualitative analysis of the comments was carried out. It was observed that design students do not necessarily pay attention to the same qualities in learner-generated content that experts rate highly, except for a particular quality at the first level of study. The content that students do engage with also changes with increasing levels of study. These findings have implications for the learning design of online design courses and qualifications as well as for design institutions seeking to supplement proximate design studios with Online Social Network Services.

 

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