Abstract

The tools we choose to derive benefit from and our perception of their significance play a determining role in how successful the designs we create will be. When we think of a tool, the first thing that comes to mind is more than likely a device you hold in your hand. However, the designs we create are not only made with tools of a physical nature but are also birthed from tools of an abstract variety. Therefore not all tools are prosthetic. Some design tools are related to or exist in the form of words. These are verbal tools. In most educational environments the impact of verbal tools – like the knowledge learned from design’s history – on the design process is often underexposed. Yet, tools like design history can be exploited for, and can be perhaps even a key to, improving our student’s designs. Within contemporary pedagogical contexts, similarly to the way in which we maintain and promote the use of visual tools, there is a great need for our verbal tools to be equally supported and nourished.

Keywords:

design pedagogy; verbal tools; design history; design practice

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License

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Jun 25th, 12:00 AM

Pedagogic Power-Tools: knowing what was and what is, for what will be

The tools we choose to derive benefit from and our perception of their significance play a determining role in how successful the designs we create will be. When we think of a tool, the first thing that comes to mind is more than likely a device you hold in your hand. However, the designs we create are not only made with tools of a physical nature but are also birthed from tools of an abstract variety. Therefore not all tools are prosthetic. Some design tools are related to or exist in the form of words. These are verbal tools. In most educational environments the impact of verbal tools – like the knowledge learned from design’s history – on the design process is often underexposed. Yet, tools like design history can be exploited for, and can be perhaps even a key to, improving our student’s designs. Within contemporary pedagogical contexts, similarly to the way in which we maintain and promote the use of visual tools, there is a great need for our verbal tools to be equally supported and nourished.

 

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