Abstract

The Integral Living Research (ILR) group approach derives from integral theory, appreciative evidence-based design, and social impact practices. This approach consists of a novel and collaborative design research method that melds the disciplines of architecture, interior design, public health, and STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math) fields into a synergistic whole that improves the capacity for change. Lack of housing equity in America has spurred this group to develop solutions to reduce housing-related stress and support enhanced well-being for urban families. The Integral Living Research (ILR) group deploys generative and empirical design research and has focused all efforts on the development and deployment of five interconnected and interdependent principles for healthy urban housing: access to green space, access to healthy food; privacy; security; and enhanced self-efficacy. This paper will explore several of the projects arising from the proposed principles as a short case study in urban well-being.

Keywords:

housing, equity, healthy living, culture of health, eviction

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License

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Aug 11th, 12:00 AM

Integral Living Research: Synergies in Research, Advocacy, and Healthy Living

The Integral Living Research (ILR) group approach derives from integral theory, appreciative evidence-based design, and social impact practices. This approach consists of a novel and collaborative design research method that melds the disciplines of architecture, interior design, public health, and STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math) fields into a synergistic whole that improves the capacity for change. Lack of housing equity in America has spurred this group to develop solutions to reduce housing-related stress and support enhanced well-being for urban families. The Integral Living Research (ILR) group deploys generative and empirical design research and has focused all efforts on the development and deployment of five interconnected and interdependent principles for healthy urban housing: access to green space, access to healthy food; privacy; security; and enhanced self-efficacy. This paper will explore several of the projects arising from the proposed principles as a short case study in urban well-being.

 

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