Abstract

Even though inclusion is a well-researched subject in design, the numerous ways to describe and understand it are unsettled. The theoretical landscape often leads into paradoxes about how to best practice inclusion in design development processes. Instead, this study probes present-day understandings of designing inclusively from the perspective of practitioners who adopt an inclusive approach in their practice. A review of existing literature helped formulate preliminary notions that guide discussions with practitioners recruited across different domains. Iterative analysis of the data from these interviews reveals some differences between the original theoretical constructs and how they are perceived and used in practice. This paper outlines the notions reformed through practitioners’ lived experiences: They are Proof of Logic, Governing Ways of Thinking, User Accessibility, Project Constraints, User Involvement, Design Stages, and Outcomes and Impact. The research can help untangle the issues that matter to practitioners which can ultimately help inform future practice.

Keywords

inclusivity, design practice, involvement, accessibility

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License

Conference Track

Research Paper

COinS
 
Jun 25th, 9:00 AM

Notions of designing inclusively from practitioner perspectives

Even though inclusion is a well-researched subject in design, the numerous ways to describe and understand it are unsettled. The theoretical landscape often leads into paradoxes about how to best practice inclusion in design development processes. Instead, this study probes present-day understandings of designing inclusively from the perspective of practitioners who adopt an inclusive approach in their practice. A review of existing literature helped formulate preliminary notions that guide discussions with practitioners recruited across different domains. Iterative analysis of the data from these interviews reveals some differences between the original theoretical constructs and how they are perceived and used in practice. This paper outlines the notions reformed through practitioners’ lived experiences: They are Proof of Logic, Governing Ways of Thinking, User Accessibility, Project Constraints, User Involvement, Design Stages, and Outcomes and Impact. The research can help untangle the issues that matter to practitioners which can ultimately help inform future practice.

 

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