Abstract

This paper analyses a research and innovation action oriented toward creating various technologies to help people with hearing impairment in calibrating their hearing devices and examines how several design artefacts (e.g., sketches, mock-ups, motion graphic videos, prototypes) were used as a knowledge translation mechanism. In particular, the paper looks at how these design artifacts supported knowledge translation in a way that helped individuals with hearing impairment to better understand the calibration process of their hearing devices and to acquire a minimal but practical vocabulary to directly interact with their devices and communicate with the audiologist. Design-based knowledge translation increased the self-efficacy of hearing aids users and put them in the condition to carry out a fine-grained and more contextually-anchored calibration process and, consequently, to feel empowered to operate with a higher degree of autonomy.

Keywords:

hearing impairment, design for healthcare, knowledge translation

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License

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Jun 25th, 12:00 AM

Toward a More Granular Management of the Calibration Process for Hearing Devices: the role of design-based knowledge translation

This paper analyses a research and innovation action oriented toward creating various technologies to help people with hearing impairment in calibrating their hearing devices and examines how several design artefacts (e.g., sketches, mock-ups, motion graphic videos, prototypes) were used as a knowledge translation mechanism. In particular, the paper looks at how these design artifacts supported knowledge translation in a way that helped individuals with hearing impairment to better understand the calibration process of their hearing devices and to acquire a minimal but practical vocabulary to directly interact with their devices and communicate with the audiologist. Design-based knowledge translation increased the self-efficacy of hearing aids users and put them in the condition to carry out a fine-grained and more contextually-anchored calibration process and, consequently, to feel empowered to operate with a higher degree of autonomy.

 

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